The Quetelet Center for Quantitative Historical Research is an interfaculty and interdisciplinary service centre that offers advice and expertise on the use of historical data that can be studied statistically or in map form.

Researchers from all disciplines and the general public can come to us with questions about the use of quantitative and quantifiable sources on Belgium's past.

In the spotlight

HISSTER / BLOGPOST / MAY 2021

The vaccination campaigns against covid-19 are in full swing in Belgium, but are not going smoothly everywhere. There are large differences between municipalities. This was also the case for the first vaccinations against smallpox, some two centuries ago. Only the relationship was the other way around: the highest vaccination coverage was recorded in the poorest regions. 

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LOKSTAT / PUBLICATION / APRIL 2021

Research into economic activities across generations has long been limited to sons, despite the importance of female employment. Vincent Delabastita and Erik Buyst (Dep. of Economics KULeuven) investigated the extent to which fathers and sons as well as mothers and daughters exercised the same profession. Their analysis, for which LOKSTAT provided contextual data, shows clear differences between the sexes.

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LOKSTAT / PUBLICATION / MARCH 2021

In the nineteenth century, the migration flows increased enormously. Journalist and historian Ellen Debackere studied the immigration policy in the city of Antwerp from 1830 to 1880 and shows how much the policy priorities differed from those of the national state. Her research is based in part on figures from LOKSTAT.

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S.O.S. ANTWERPEN / CITIZEN SCIENCE / FEBRUARY 2021

At the end of October 2020, the Quetelet Center launched the citizen science project S.O.S. Antwerp (Social Inequalities at Death (1820-1946). What did the people of Antwerp die of?). In this project, the data of the unique handwritten cause-of-death register of the city of Antwerp are entered into a digital database by volunteers working at home. 


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